Best camera focal length for sculpting?

I’m curious if other people change the default camera focal length when in perspective mode? Is there an optimal setting or is it just personal preference?
If you are sculpting something like a face from a reference photo, I guess you want to play around with the setting until you think you have matched the perspective of the photo.
If you were sculpting a portrait from life, with a person sitting perhaps 1 metre away from you, is there a focal length setting which ought to be “correct” to match your viewpoint in real life?
Unfortunately I don’t understand the the theory behind the numbers, so I’m left just setting it to what looks about right.

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Hi, for me i use a lot the orthographic view and i switch sometime with the camera view, 50mm (it’s like the human eye, that’s what i read about it). But if you do something bigger than a face, like a creature, sometime it’s better to decrease the focal. Also it depend what kind of render you want to do, because it could make a huge différence about the feeling of your subject. I think the best think to do is to experiment😉

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Hi, camera with focal length from 50 and below are nice for your final renders.
For sculpting try to use something more like 80 to 100 to avoid deformations.
If you’re working with portrait photo references they surely have been shot with that type of focal length.
Like Pomme11 says you can also turn off perspective by switching to orthographic but some people find this to “mathematical”. It’s a matter of taste.

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Thanks for the replies. I just watched this video by someone who seems to be a very expert professional, and he actually mentions having difficulties matching the focal length of his reference images. I suspect trial and error is often the best solution!

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